Baby movements

So I’m pretty sure I felt baby G move on Tuesday (15+2)! It was after our midwife appointment, we were at the supermarket and I suddenly felt fluttering in my tummy, you know like when you have one of those twitches you can’t control, and like butterflies! It lasted about 2 or 3 minutes, but I wasn’t sure at first because I didn’t feel anything again until last night when I went to bed, it was exactly the same and lasted 1 or 2 minutes. 


I had to ask people on the forum as I wasn’t sure, I thought it might be my tummy messing me about or rumbling or something, but even so, I’ve never felt anything like this before, so it seems so! When I was reading the replies to my post I felt it again, and I can feel slightly now as I’m writing this!


Hubby keeps trying to feel it, but I told him he won’t be able to feel anything just yet, so he just keeps talking to bump instead, bless him!


When did you first feel your baby move?

Routine midwife visit (update)

Yesterday was our 15/16 week routine midwife visit. Just went through the norms, my blood results from booking in came back fine for everything, then she took more blood for the Down’s screening, as the sonographer couldn’t get a measurement at our scan! I will get the results from that through the post. I told her about the bleeding I’d had, and that there’d been nothing since, so she was pleased about that. 


I mentioned about my headaches, she said I am safe to take 2 paracetemol, and if it doesn’t go after that then it is a “hormone headache”. I then decided that if it does disappear, then it must just be a husband headache! (Don’t tell him I said that!) I have only been taking half at once though so far, and it’s gone, so it must be the latter…


Next appointment is at 25 weeks, on the 29th November, when she will measure bump and listen in! Exciting! Though we have our 20 week scan before that so that is more exciting 🙂

15 weeks… and a bump (pic)

Today marks 15 weeks pregnant! 

Has been quite a strange day, well not strange as such, but ‘thoughtful’. We went to a car boot this morning, and walking around there were a lot of pregnant women, including me, and it was just so strange to be ‘with them’ rather than ‘against them’ I think. Looking at myself in the mirror, it still seems strange, and it still feels strange to me that I actually have a human being growing inside of me after all this time!

Talking of looking in the mirror, look what I noticed on Friday!



I’m sure it just appeared overnight, after the panic on Thursday! I love it. (Even though I’m convinced half of that is still fat… This is another thing, I just can’t over the feeling of and thinking that I look fat…)

Thought we were going back to the start…

Yesterday (Thursday) was quite a scary, emotional day. Had some bleeding in the morning, first time I went to the toilet, and then the second time, which was worse than before. Cue panic mode and the beginning of a morning of crying from me. 

I obviously thought the worst was happening so I rang the mw in tears, who told me she couldn’t do anything or refer me, so to ring my GP and he would get me a referral to the EPU. So I rang my GP, he rang the EPU and then rang me back to go there in the afternoon. I then rang hubby at work to let him know, but this was an hour before his dinner so I was sat crying for an hour! Eventually he rang back and I was in tears, he said he was asking to leave and then he’d be straight home. He rang me to let me know he was on his way so I ran a bath to calm down a bit. It took him 20 minutes to cycle home, whereas on his bike it usually takes 35-40 minutes!

I had my bath, then got ready to go, drank a bit of water in case they did a scan (GP said they were just listening for a heartbeat as I was “only” 14+4, but I thought it might be too early so went prepared). 

We got there, saw the mw, she took some details as to when the bleeding started etc., then we went to listen for a heartbeat. Of course, she couldn’t find one so that set me in panic mode again! Anyway, she said go and sit back in the waiting area and we’ll get you in for a scan. So sat there for 15 mins, worried sick, then we were called through for our scan.

The sonographer took some details, then got baby up on the screen. A heartbeat! It was flashing! Oh my, I was so relieved, I immediately burst into tears. Baby was totally oblivious, sleeping happily on his/her head! 

Needless to say, we were so so happy, relieved, you name it. I had a major headache after all the crying so we headed home and I went for a lie down. Hubby looked after me all night, made me an amazing spaghetti bolognese, and was just generally a wonderful husband. We also had stern words with the belly bean (thanks Kylie, I love that!) not to scare us like that again!

Oh, just before I finish, one of the receptionists there asked if I was pregnant, and wished us congratulations, as she recognised us from when we were having treatment (our antenatal/scan/gynae unit is joined together, and all 3 desks joined together, she works on the antenatal unit I think)! That’s how much time we spend at the hospital!


(Never posted the update from 14 weeks so here it is)

PCOS

As part of PCOS awareness month, I am going to be writing a couple of posts on PCOS and how it can affect individuals. 


PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome) is thought to affect approximately 5-10% of women of reproductive age – so every 1 in 20 to 1 in 10 women. Of these, as many as 30% do not actually have PCO (Polycystic Ovaries) as a symptom (I would be an example of this). Of course this is not a definitive number, as many women go undiagnosed for years. For example, I wasn’t diagnosed until I was 24, and this was after 10 months of investigation. Some women can also just have PCO without any other symptom of PCOS. 


There are many symptoms of PCOS, some are visible to other people, some are not. 

  • absent or irregular periods
  • no ovulation/infrequent ovulation
  • high levels of testosterone
  • being overweight or obese
  • excess hair
  • acne
  • depression/mood swings
  • cysts on the ovary/ies
  • infertility
PCO/PCOS is thought to be one of the leading causes of infertility in women. 



What are cysts on the ovaries? 

We all know that cysts are fluid filled sacs. But on the ovaries, cysts form when follicles (where the egg develops) stop growing too early, and instead of the follicles bursting to release the egg, they form cysts.


I think I may have PCOS, what should I do? 


Go to see your GP, and explain your symptoms. If they rule out other problems and agree with you, they will probably send you for tests such as blood tests and an ultrasound scan. If you are then diagnosed with PCOS, you may be referred to a specialist.

Can PCOS be treated? 


Yes it can, both through self help (eating a healthy balanced diet, exercise, managing stress levels, and various hair removal methods for excess hair) and medical help (such as the contraceptive pill, metformin, and fertility medicines such as clomifene (also known as clomid). In other cases, surgery may be required). The thing to remember is that although it can be treated, it cannot be cured. 


Although PCOS has symptoms to diagnose it, PCOS can also cause other things, such as
  • type II diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • depression/anxiety
  • weight gain
  • miscarriage


The good thing is, that infertility caused by PCOS can be treated in many cases, and couples can come away with a perfectly healthy baby. Unfortunately, some are not so lucky. This will be covered in another blog post.

Which symptoms of PCOS do you display? How & when did you discover you had PCOS?

For further information, see these sources: BUPAWikipediaNHS